Fair Census

The United States Constitution requires that the nation’s population is counted every ten years to ensure equal representation for all communities. The entire population of the United States must be counted, not just citizens. For many reasons, it is vitally important that everyone is counted.

Communities of color have historically been undercounted in the United States of America. Undercounting of the Black population was first required by law. The Three-Fifths Compromise of the Constitutional Convention in 1787 counted enslaved Black people as three-fifths of a person in apportioning congressional districts for the U.S. House of Representatives. Since then, the Census has severely undercounted the Black population, to great disadvantage in representation, resources and power.

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The United States Constitution requires that the nation’s population is counted every ten years to ensure equal representation for all communities. The entire population of the United States must be counted, not just citizens. For many reasons, it is vitally important that everyone is counted.

Communities of color have historically been undercounted in the United States of America. Undercounting of the Black population was first required by law. The Three-Fifths Compromise of the Constitutional Convention in 1787 counted enslaved Black people as three-fifths of a person in apportioning congressional districts for the U.S. House of Representatives. Since then, the Census has severely undercounted the Black population, to great disadvantage in representation, resources and power.

Sign up to stay up to date.