Skip to main content
Resolution

NAACP Calls for a Federal Budget that is Fair and Equitable and Does Not Harm Low and Middle-Income Americans

WHEREAS, a nation's budget is perhaps one of the best reflections of the priorities of her people; and

WHEREAS, the NAACP has consistently supported federal budgets which are fair to all Americans, puts our fiscal house in order and does not rely on cutting essential services to low- and middle-income Americans to reduce our national deficit; and

WHEREAS, our nation's communities of color have been hit disproportionately hard by the effects of the current recession, and even as we slowly emerge from this economic disaster, our communities continue to experience disproportionately higher rates of unemployment, home foreclosure, educational disadvantages and economic hardship. As a result, vulnerable communities are increasingly relying on public programs to meet their basic needs; and

WHEREAS, since 1981 the Congressional Black Caucus has crafted and offered an alternative budget which has consistently made significant investments in education, job creation and training, economic development, healthcare, transportation and infrastructure, and advanced research and development programs that will accelerate the economic recovery while, at the same time protecting the social safety net without cutting Social Security, killing Medicaid, or making seniors contribute more to Medicare; and

WHEREAS, in the final version of the budget for the remainder of fiscal year 2011 (which began October 1, 2010 and will continue through to September 30, 2011), which was signed into law on April 15, 2011, there were a number of programs whose funding was either reduced or eliminated which will result in hardships for those among us who are most vulnerable. These cuts include:

WHEREAS, Congress and the President are now turning their attention to the federal budget for fiscal year 2012, which begins October 1, 2011; and

WHEREAS, on April 15, 2011, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a "budget resolution", which although non-binding is seen as a blueprint for the federal budget; and

WHEREAS, the House-passed budget resolution for fiscal year 2012, which the NAACP opposed, contains massive spending cuts-totaling more than $4.3 trillion-that disproportionately impacts critical initiatives serving our nation's most vulnerable communities, including racial and ethnic minority children, jobless workers, and low-income families; and

WHEREAS, included in this budget blueprint were also several proposals which the NAACP ardently opposes, including:

Cut $127 billion from SNAP (formerly called food stamps) in a six-year period (2015 through 2021 ). This proposal to block-grant and reduce finding represents a cut of 25 percent in food benefits for some of the most vulnerable Americans. States will be forced to cut benefits to some households or create waiting lists for needy families;

Preserve tax breaks for the wealthiest Americans. and in fact give an additional $4.2 trillion in tax breaks to millionaires and corporations.

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the NAACP reiterates its call, as expressed in resolutions from 1974, 1981, 1984 and 1994 to Congress and the President to enact a budget that does not cut civil and human rights protections or reduce or eliminate the government's human needs assistance to the most vulnerable among us; and

THEREFORE, BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED, that the NAACP supports an approach which considers revenue, expenditures, entitlements and defense spending when reducing our national deficit; one that includes responsible decisions to raise new avenue by broadening the tax base; strategically assessing cuts to our largest expenditures, including military war spending; and making our tax system more 'air and closing tax loopholes and preferences which contributed to a significant

  • Head Start was targeted for one of the biggest reductions, a $1 billion cut below fiscal2010. The massive cuts to the Head Start Program will remove 218,000 low income children and families and close more than 16,000 Head Start and Early Head Start classrooms across the country. It will leave 55,000 teachers, teacher assistants, and related staff without jobs;
  • The Pell Grant scholarship maximum award will be reduced by $845, from $5,550 to $4,750, about 15%. Many of the 9.4 million students who are projected to receive a Pell Grant in the 2011-2012 school year will see a lower grant award, requiring them to take on more loans for their college tuition. Pell Grants provide the basic foundation of federal student aid and currently help more than 8 million students afford to attend college;
  • A reduction of $600 million in funding to community-oriented policing. Such a cut will require a complete elimination of the hiring programs. Over the years, COPS has funded the hiring of more than 122,000 state and local police officers and sheriff's deputies in communities across America. This proposed cut will prevent the hiring and rehiring of over 3,000 fewer law enforcement officers;
  • A cut of $1.3 billion of funding previously allocated to support Community Health Centers. These types of facilities are widely utilized in low income areas and oftentimes, are the backbone of health care services in the areas in which they are located. Without them, quality health care for many poor and disadvantaged Americans will be out of reach;
  • A reduction in Title I education funds, which help school districts with low¬≠ income students, of $693.5 million. The cut to Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act will mean 2,400 schools that serve nearly 1 million disadvantaged students would lose funding for teachers, tutors, and after-school programs. Nearly 10,000 teacher aides could lose their jobs;
  • $758 million will be cut from the WIG (Women, Infants and Children) program, which supplements nutrition for low-income and disadvantaged women and children;
  • A complete elimination ($88 million) of funding for the HUD Housing Counseling Assistance Programs;
  • Job training programs will be cut by $2 billion;
  • A reduction of nearly $2 million dollars from the Minority Business Development Agency;
  • The key Education Department program for historically black colleges and universities will lose $85 million of the $266 million it received in 2010, or about a third of it;
  • The entire Title X provision, which funds family planning resources such as Planned Parenthood, will be eliminated, a cut of $327 million. Family planning funding has been an essential tool for many communities, especially in low income areas;
  • Juvenile justice programs will be reduced by $2.3 million;
  • A 78% reduction in federal funds for Hispanic-serving colleges;
  • A complete elimination of Federal support for several other programs for minority-serving colleges, including tribal colleges and institutions that serve significant numbers of black and Asian students;
  • The elimination of $103 million for the Tech-Prep Program for vocational education, which heavily benefits community colleges;
  • An elimination of funding for the creation and support of statewide education data systems;
  • The EPA's budget is reduced by $1.6 billion from fiscal year 2010 levels; and
  • High-speed rail programs will be cut by $1 billion; and
    • A complete repeal of the 2010 health care reform law;
    • A plan to privatize Medicare;
    • Turning Medicaid into a block grant program, which would pay less than it currently does for fewer services;
    • Cutting $750 billion from programs that serve low and moderate income families, including public education, job training programs, and other vital services, including reducing Pell grants to 2008 levels;

WHEREAS, Congress and the President are now turning their attention to the federal budget for fiscal year 2012, which begins October 1, 2011; and

WHEREAS, on April 15, 2011, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a "budget resolution", which although non-binding is seen as a blueprint for the federal budget; and

WHEREAS, the House-passed budget resolution for fiscal year 2012, which the NAACP opposed, contains massive spending cuts-totaling more than  $4.3 trillion-that disproportionately impacts critical initiatives serving our nation's most vulnerable communities, including racial and ethnic minority children, jobless workers, and low-income families; and

WHEREAS, included in this budget blueprint were also several proposals which the NAACP ardently opposes, including:

  • A complete repeal of the 2010 health care reform law;
  • A plan to privatize Medicare;
  • Turning Medicaid into a block grant program, which would pay less than it currently does for fewer services;
  • Cutting $750 billion from programs that serve low and moderate income families, including public education, job training programs, and other vital services, including reducing Pell grants to 2008 levels; Cut $127 billion from SNAP (formerly called food stamps) in a six-year period (2015 through 2021 ). This proposal to block-grant and reduce finding represents a cut of 25 percent in food benefits for some of the most vulnerable Americans. States will be forced to cut benefits to some households or create waiting lists for needy families; Preserve tax breaks for the wealthiest Americans. and in fact give an additional $4.2 trillion in tax breaks to millionaires and corporations.

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the NAACP reiterates its call, as expressed in resolutions from 1974, 1981, 1984 and 1994 to Congress and the President to enact a budget that does not cut civil and human rights protections or reduce or eliminate the government's human needs assistance to the most vulnerable among us; and

THEREFORE, BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED, that the NAACP supports an approach which considers revenue, expenditures, entitlements and defense spending when reducing our national deficit; one that includes responsible decisions to raise new revenue by broadening the tax base; strategically assessing cuts to our largest expenditures, including military war spending; and making our tax system more fair and closing tax loopholes and preferences which contributed to a significant loss of American jobs.

Together Power Vote Hero - NAACP

Funding Freedom Summer

The battle for our freedoms is going on right now, and with your help today, we can work together to repair America's democracy. Let's join forces and make a positive change for our country.

Donate Now