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Amos C. Brown Student Fellowship to Ghana

Program Overview

The Amos C. Brown Student Fellowship to Ghana is the first program of its kind to be powered by the NAACP, in collaboration with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. The fully funded 10-day excursion, from July 31- August 10, will take a selected number of multicultural college students, young adults, and seminarians between the ages of 18 and 25 from the United States to Ghana for an experiential learning opportunity, at no cost to the students. While there, they will be immersed in Ghanaian culture, learn about the Atlantic Slave Trade, and receive deep insights into their ancestral lineage.  At the end of this journey, participants will be able to work together to be agents of change across the United States.

During this Fellowship, participants will:

  • Build bridges with Ghanaian counterparts, as well as understand and respect the history of Ghana as the oldest independent African state.
  • Gain experience about the Atlantic Slave Trade.
  • Be ambassadors for social and racial justice.
  • Learn about civil rights leaders who engaged in the pan-African movement and how this movement has relevance in current racial and social issues within the U.S.
  • Leave the program with an understanding of the Latter-Day Saints members who supported and participated in the Abolitionist movement.

Guided by the student outcomes, we are providing an experiential learning opportunity that will return participants to their perspective communities better equipped to become social justice leaders.

Akwaaba - Fellows Welcome to Ghana
Ghanaian Dancers - Accra Ghana
Amos C. Brown - Namesake of Ghana Fellowship
Group Photo - Amos C. Fellows in Ballroom
Celebratory dance performance - Amos C Brown Fellowship to Ghana
Welcome Dinner - Amos C Brown Fellowship to Ghana
Reverend Amos Brown addresses the fellows and supporters during the welcome dinner at Movepick Hotel Monday night.
President Derrick Johnson - Amos Brown fellows - Welcome Dinner
Amos C Brown Fellows Group Photo
Amber Thomas and Amos C Brown Fellows
Home of W.E.B Dubois
Ghanaian dancers and drummers
Fellows listen at the W.E.B. Du Bois Centre about the historic legacy of Dubois and his impact on connecting North America to the African diaspora.
Fellows greet the Chiefs and Queen Mothers at Assin Manso before taking part in the “Last Bath” as they ventured down the trail African ancestors were forced to walk to be bathed for the last time before being traded into slavery.
Wisdom Cole - Assin Manso - Ghana
Assin Manso - Ghana - Slave River
“Last Bath’ at Assin Manson
Akwaaba - Fellows Welcome to Ghana
Ghanaian Dancers - Accra Ghana
Amos C. Brown - Namesake of Ghana Fellowship
Group Photo - Amos C. Fellows in Ballroom
Celebratory dance performance - Amos C Brown Fellowship to Ghana
Welcome Dinner - Amos C Brown Fellowship to Ghana
Reverend Amos Brown addresses the fellows and supporters during the welcome dinner at Movepick Hotel Monday night.
President Derrick Johnson - Amos Brown fellows - Welcome Dinner
Amos C Brown Fellows Group Photo
Amber Thomas and Amos C Brown Fellows
Home of W.E.B Dubois
Ghanaian dancers and drummers
Fellows listen at the W.E.B. Du Bois Centre about the historic legacy of Dubois and his impact on connecting North America to the African diaspora.
Fellows greet the Chiefs and Queen Mothers at Assin Manso before taking part in the “Last Bath” as they ventured down the trail African ancestors were forced to walk to be bathed for the last time before being traded into slavery.
Wisdom Cole - Assin Manso - Ghana
Assin Manso - Ghana - Slave River
“Last Bath’ at Assin Manson
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AKWAABA! (Welcome!) - a warm and enthusiastic greeting as Ghana welcomes 43 Amos C.. Brown fellows to Accra Ghana after a 10.5 hour plane ride from Washington, DC to West Africa.
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Amos C. Brown fellows and NAACP staff join with dancers from Ghana in their celebratory welcome to Accra, Ghana.
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Reverend Amos C. Brown, the namesake of the Ghana fellowship program looks on pleased as fellows, staff, and Ghanian dancers perform at the celebratory welcome as they leave the airport.
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Amos Brown Fellows stand to be recognized at their welcome dinner at Movenpick Hotel and Ballroom in Accra, Ghana. 43 fellows young adults and seminarians between the ages of 18 and 25 took the trip from the U.S. for an experiential learning opportunity.
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Celebratory dance performance to welcome the Amos Brown Fellows during the welcome dinner on the first of their 10-day excursion.
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Students share their thoughts during the welcome dinner just hours after landing in Accra, Ghana at their welcome dinner.
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Reverend Amos Brown addresses the fellows and supporters during the welcome dinner at Movepick Hotel Monday night.
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President Derrick Johnson addresses Amos Brown fellows the evening of the welcome dinner at Movepick Hotel in Accra, Ghana. President Johnson spoke about the importance of the students embracing this moment and stepping into their individual power.
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The collective poses in front of the Jubilee House, where the Ghanaian president, his excellency Nana Akufo-Addo operates in service of the people of Ghana. Jubilee House was named in recognition of the 50th anniversary of Ghana's independence.
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Amber Thomas, VP of Operations speaks to a few of the fellows on the importance W.E.B Dubois has played in the history of the NAACP, as students visited the home and tomb of Dubois while in Accra, Ghana.
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Fellows reviewing articles and documents throughout out the home of W.E.B Dubois. Many of the these items remain untouched even after his death in 1963.
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Ghanian dancers and drummers address fellows and staff during their visit to Osikan Ocean Rock Center.
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Fellows listen at the W.E.B. Du Bois Centre about the historic legacy of Dubois and his impact on connecting North America to the African diaspora.
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Fellows greet the Chiefs and Queen Mothers at Assin Manso before taking part in the "Last Bath" as they ventured down the trail African ancestors were forced to walk to be bathed for the last time before being traded into slavery.
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Wisdom Cole, National Director of NAACP Youth and College looks on as participants visit Assin Manso, the location where many slaves were bathed in the river for the last time prior to being placed on ships to take the journey across the Atlantic Ocean.
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Fellows journey through Assin Manso down the trail of African ancestors to "Slave River", and were forced to be bathed for the last time before being traded into slavery.
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Fellows participate in the "Last Bath' at Assin Manson.
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